Reading books can be depressing. Just look at your shelves and see whether anybody got through unscathed without murders, backstabbing, suicides and vampire-related or non-muggle deaths. If you had too much of these sob stories, which let’s face it — most novels are, then Swallows and Amazons can be your remedy.

There is (not really) any villains here, nobody gets killed, almost everybody is a model citizen and nothing much really happens for the first 250 pages. Oh, but there is a LOT of sailing though. Pick up this book if you are a young sailor who has his private…


I am wary to read Palahniuk books after having read Choke a long, long time ago. The trouble is, I loved some of his stuff. Haunted and Fight Club are some of my favourite books when I started reading, especially in uni. But that maybe the issue here, when at that time I was a young undergrad who was looking for the next unique style. I thought Palahniuk was unique, ballsy and witty. …


I couldn’t make out Ballard when I first started reading him. The first of his books that I picked up was Kingdom Come which I almost couldn’t finish at some point as it frustrated me endlessly for its vague description of the action that happens, its cold tone and unlikeable characters that I couldn’t care less about. I really started liking Ballard after reading The Drowned World which really blew me away, that I found believable in its grim prediction of the world to come — feverish, swampish, replete with giant mosquitos. …


Or really - why I read the books that I read. Because we all have our own reasons to read and it’s more varied than there are pages in a book. How long is a piece of string?

This post is a self-justification of what I read because sometimes, I question the reasons of my reading. Even when I discuss this doubt to other readers and friends who are readers, they will give me good reasons and the benefits of reading — it widens your world-view, it makes you read and write better, it makes you in general more intelligent.


The Narnia books are so well-known that it hardly needs an introduction. Yet, it is hard to describe what Narnia is really like because each story is different, with the span of sometimes hundreds of years. It is a land of talking animals, fairytale creatures, of magic, wise kings and a talking lion. Sure, Narnia demands some leaps of faith from the readers, but it is a worthwhile destination.

I am currently at the end of my second month of lockdown, even though I haven’t really been counting it. I live in a small loft apartment with my partner and…


I gotta talk about the ending, so spoilers spoilers spoilers!

Out of all the Narnia books published, I felt that this has the most weight on its shoulder. It is the Avengers: Endgame of Narnia that ties all the stories together. In this regard, it finds success. But in terms of gratification, I feel a bit let down though the ending was so grand, and the last couple of pages were just plain shocking. …


Almost forgot that there’s spoilers below — so read the dayum book!

At this point, the Narnia saga takes a turn to a more serious tone. There are real deaths and real vitriol here that the latter books, while still read as fantasy adventures, become more grim. There is real threat to the characters and at the same time, Narnia isn’t as happy a place depicted in all its previous books. There is all the good stuff here: kidnapping, murder and revenge. Parents forewarned.

The Narnia of The Silver Chair is a Narnia ruled by a king robbed of his…


Narnia books are tricky to review because they are so different from each other, and in many ways they all can be unsettling, but some can be refreshing with a healthy dose of adventure and imagination. This is the strength of Narnia, that the world is fully realised. The sequels of Narnia are located in different directions from its original world, thus expanding the world even more. To the East is the sea and the book is a telling of Caspian’s journey to the unchartered “end of the world” along with Lucy, Edmund and their annoying cousin Eustace.

It is…


By this time, Uber and Airbnb (as well as Facebook, Amazon, Google, etc) have become staples of the Silicon Valley lore. This is probably the tale that business leaders from one generation will hand down to the next generation — how young, idealistic entrepreneurs carved their way into the accommodation and transportation market that has long since stagnated. Disruption is a cliché in the startup terminology, but it is for the pursuit of disruption that startups exist.

There are a multitude of books which rehashes the tales of these startups written from different angles. Airbnb and Uber rose like twin…


After the high of reading The Horse and His Boy, Prince Caspian let me down. One thing I didn’t realise was that The Horse and His Boy was published later than Prince Caspian and even though they were only four years apart, it seems that the former is a more consistent work. Prince Caspian was the second Narnia book published and perhaps Lewis was still trying to find his footing with the world of his own making.

The Pevensie children, a year after getting out of the wardrobe and settling back into their own reality as English schoolchildren were summoned…

Kit Teguh

A full time project manager who loves to read on the side. Connect with me to chat anything tech and lit.

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